ARTFIXdaily News Feed - Breaking News from the Art World

Italian judge demands return of the Getty Bronze

Los Angeles Times / February 11th, 2010

A judge in Italy has ordered the confiscation of the famed Statue of the Victorious Youth, which is also known as the Getty Bronze. The artwork, which dates from 300 B.C. to 100 B.C., is currently a star in the collection at the Getty Museum in Los Angeles. In the past, the Getty has stated that ...

Biblical brothers, scorched saints intrigue in Met's Bronzino show

Bloomberg / February 9th, 2010

An exhibition on Florentine artist Agnolo Bronzino (1503-72) at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art serves up almost 60 pieces by this master draftsman ranging from doodles and rough sketches to dazzling figures and portraits -- all serving the function of practice for a separate finished work. ...

PREVIEW: From the Gothic Tradition to the Early Renaissance

ARTFIXdaily / January 6th, 2010

Moretti Fine Art will stage their third US exhibition, entitled From the Gothic Tradition to the Early Renaissance, at their gallery at 24 East 80th Street, New York, from 19 January to 12 February 2010.  Some twenty works will not only reveal the richness of gold-ground and panel ...

Picasso, other art works stolen from Provencal villa

Reuters / January 3rd, 2010

Thieves have stolen about 30 paintings, including works by Pablo Picasso and post-impressionist Henri Rousseau, from a private villa in the south of France, police said on Saturday. The haul was worth about 1 million euros ($1.43 million). The theft was discovered on Thursday by a caretaker at ...

'Paris, 1889' recreated in Cleveland

News-Herald / November 22nd, 2009

When Paul Gauguin's work was rejected from the 1889 Exposition Universelle in Paris, he was insulted. So he contacted Volpini, the owner of Cafe des Arts next to the Exposition grounds and organized a group exhibition there, a seminal point in Gauguin's career. The Cleveland Museum of Art is now ...

Stolen painting creates buzz at National Gallery Ireland

Irish Indepedent / November 5th, 2009

A famous Irish painting whose location remained a mystery for 17 years after it was stolen in an audacious art heist was unveiled to the public on Wed. Jack Yeats' (brother of the poet William Butler Yeats) 1915 painting 'Bachelor's Walk, In Memory' was brazenly taken from Dunsany Castle, a ...

New bidders, high competition drive up prices at Sotheby's

New York Times / November 5th, 2009

Following the tepid Christie's sale on Tues., Sotheby's sold a surprisingly strong $181.7 million worth of art, well above its high $163 million estimate for 66 works offered; 10 failed to sell. The strength of the evening lay in the material: Publisher S.I. Newhouse's Giacometti brought $19.3 ...

Egyptian Art Deco in Ohio: Backyard sculpture fetches $118,000 at auction

Cleveland Plain Dealer / November 2nd, 2009

On Oct. 25, the Cleveland Auction Co. in Tremont, Ohio, sold a 4-foot tall garden statue for $100,000 – plus an $18,000 commission for the auctioneer. The piece, a woman carrying a water vessel, was created in Paris in 1931 by Egyptian sculptor Mahmoud Mokhtar (1891-1934), known as the father of ...

On the Block: Traditional Offerings, Bargain Prices

New York Times / November 2nd, 2009

The images splashed across the pages of this fall’s auction catalogs are as familiar as they are telling: Degas dancers and Pissarro landscapes; Picasso portraits and Warhol dollar bills. All are well-known works by tried-and-true artists carrying estimates as low as sellers are willing to go. ...

A Revelation: The letters of Vincent Van Gogh

Telegraph / November 1st, 2009

Van Gogh’s 800 letters to his brother Theo take us to a place where even the most detailed biography can’t go. A newly translated, fully annotated and copiously illustrated edition has been in preparation for 15 years. Beautifully produced by Thames & Hudson in six volumes (and free ...

Shine On: New Versailles exhibit reflects Sun King's glory

Cape Cod Times 2 / November 1st, 2009

Hundreds of long-dispersed portraits, sculptures and tapestries celebrating Louis XIV have returned to Versailles. The exhibit "Louis XIV: The Man and the King" gives visitors the 17th-century ruler in all his varied incarnations. A massive oil painting shows the cherub-faced child who ascended ...

"It Don't Look Like Much": Possible Picasso sold for two bucks

NY Daily News / October 27th, 2009

A Louisiana woman sold a painting for a mere $2 at a garage sale -- and then learned it could be an original Picasso, according to ABC News. Edith Parker, of Shreveport, was shocked to learn the painting may be worth millions of dollars. Parker lives in a trailer park. ""I kept ...

Banks Hoard Troves of Art: Public wants to see corporate collections

New York Times Art / October 25th, 2009

The art owned by financial institutions should get out more — at the least to give the taxpayers, who have been so generous with the financial sector, an aesthetic return. Deutsche Bank is believed to own the largest corporate collection in the world, with some 60,000 pieces of contemporary art. ...

"The Sacred Made Real": Spanish Painting and Sculpture, 1600-1700

Guardian / October 25th, 2009

This is the most powerful show London's National Gallery is ever likely to hold. One can say that without overstatement. It is not common for people to weep at a press view, nor to fall silent with awe, but both happened this week at "The Sacred Made Real." El Greco to Velázquez, forgotten ...

Style-Mixing Guru: Designer Suzanne Tucker will speak at SF Fall Antiques Show

San Francisco Chronicle / October 25th, 2009

At this year's San Francisco Fall Antiques Show, which will be held Thursday through Nov. 1, interior designer Suzanne Tucker will reveal her creative insights in a lecture based on her new book "Rooms to Remember: The Classic Interiors of Suzanne Tucker." Tucker is known as especially adept at ...

Distress Sale: Financier sends $40 million worth of art to auction

Bloomberg / October 21st, 2009

A collection of 39 major modern and Impressionist artworks, including paintings by Monet, de Chirico, Degas and Picasso, will be offered by Dutch financier Louis Reijtenbagh, who resolved three legal claims earlier this year. The works will be auctioned in New York on Nov. 4 and 5 and may fetch ...

At Buckingham Palace: Exhibition exposes Queen Victoria's passions

Daily Mail / October 15th, 2009

By Victorian standards, it is rather daring. Even more so when one realises that the lovely young woman languorously baring her shoulders is none other than Queen Victoria. The Winterhalter portrait, known as ‘the secret picture’, was commissioned by the young Queen in 1843 as a 24th birthday ...

"No Love Lost": Damien Hirst's return to painting

AP / October 13th, 2009

Damien Hirst has made a fortune and become an art-world brand by peering at life's dark side. Rows of skulls stare sightless from deep blue backgrounds in a new exhibition by the man who turned pickled sharks and rotting cows' heads into multimillion-dollar works of art. The most striking thing ...

Bailed-out Must Share Art: Royal Bank of Scotland to display hidden collection

Guardian / October 12th, 2009

The Royal Bank of Scotland is to open one of the largest collections of British art in private hands to the public after it was accused of hiding its collection in its corporate offices and vaults. RBS, which is 70% owned by the taxpayer, has 2,200+ pieces, including work by David Hockney and Sir ...

London News: Richard Green makes a stand on Bond Street

Telegraph / October 6th, 2009

LONDON - The old names of Bond Street have taken a pounding over the last year. But although Agnew’s may have moved out, and Partridge closed down, at 32 and 33 New Bond Street, painting purveyor Richard Green is expanding with grand plans for the entire building. On view will be Old ...