Pink Seesaw Installation on the US-Mexico Border Wall Wins Design of the Year Award

  • January 19, 2021 11:11

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The Teeter-Totter Wall at the US-Mexico border won the 2020 Design of the Year award. The Design Museum; Image: Luis Torres/AFP/Getty Images

Pink seesaws installed at the US-Mexico border won a 2020 Design of the Year Award, in the annual recognition sponsored by Beazley and the Design Museum (UK). The Teeter-Totter Wall aimed to bring people together with a playful and meaningful bridge between sides on the border of El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. 

Ronald Rael, a professor of architecture at the University of California, Berkeley, and Virginia San Fratello, an associate professor of design at San José State University, had developed the idea since 2006 and collaborated with Colectivo Chopeke on the seesaws, which went viral in July 2019 when people on both sides played together on the brief installation.

Stormzy's stab-proof vest designed by Bansky was a nominee in the graphics category. The Design Museum; Image: Felix Speller

The Teeter-Totter Wall was the overall winner and also won in the transport category. Six category winners were awarded prizes for innovation in product, architecture, digital, fashion, graphics and transport.

Other winners included a 3D rendering of the virus causing Covid-19 by Alissa Eckert and Dan Higgins for graphics, the vegan Impossible Burger 2.0 for product, the vegan Telfar bag for fashion, and a ModSkool designed by Social Design Collaborative for architecture. The Chilean feminist group Colectivo LASTESIS won the digital category with its protest against sexual violence.

Bansky's union flag stab-proof vest worn by the musician Stormzy at Glastonbury 2019 was a nominee in graphics.

The People’s Choice award went to small brick arches made by protesters in Hong Kong, which were used as roadblocks to slow down police vehicles during the protests in 2019.

The Design Museum offers online talks, a virtual exhibition and a catalogue of 2020's inventions and innovative designs.

Read more at Guardian

Tags: design

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