Pantone Color of the Year 2019 is Living Coral

  • December 06, 2018 17:09

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Jannis Spyropoulos, Vineyard, 1952. The Vorres Museum, Paiania, Attiki, Greece.
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PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral

From fashion to homewares, interior design to everyday products, our visual experience from year-to-year is often influenced by Pantone's pick of "color of the year." Since 2000, the Pantone Color Institute has declared a choice of "top color" that makes its way into brands, onto runways, and can subtly cue aesthetic choices even in the art and antiques market.

For 2019, nature gets a nod with red-orange Living Coral. While the company proclaims the color represents our "innate need for optimism," there is a grim irony (or an insightful message) in the name "Living Coral," as human activity has caused the bleaching and dying of coral reefs, with damning evidence just released of increasing carbon emissions set to damage the environment.

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In a statement, Pantone described the hue in upbeat terms:

Vibrant, yet mellow PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral embraces us with warmth and nourishment to provide comfort and buoyancy in our continually shifting environment.

In reaction to the onslaught of digital technology and social media increasingly embedding into daily life, we are seeking authentic and immersive experiences that enable connection and intimacy. Sociable and spirited, the engaging nature of PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral welcomes and encourages lighthearted activity. Symbolizing our innate need for optimism and joyful pursuits, PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral embodies our desire for playful expression.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, 1841-1919 Young Girls Looking at an Album, 1892 Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA
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Representing the fusion of modern life, PANTONE Living Coral is a nurturing color that appears in our natural surroundings and at the same time, displays a lively presence within social media.


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