Featured 19th Century Painter: Edward Norton (E.N.) Griffith (American 1858 - 1948)

  • April 19, 2021 09:56

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Edward Norton (E.N.) Griffith (American 1858 - 1948): Presidential Trompe L'oeil - Oil on canvas, 21.75 x 15.75 inches/Signed lower right

Trompe l'oeil life artist Edward Norton Griffith was born in Belvedere, New Jersey, the son of a Methodist preacher. Very little biographical information is available for him; however, public records show him as living in Irvington, NJ by 1895 (but may have arrived there before then). Not as well-known as trompe l’oeil artist, Michael Hartnett, one of Griffith’s works was described by American Art Historian, William A. Gerdts, as taking “on the total iconography of Harnett, but approached it in a manner not only painterly but really romantic, with an emphasis upon irregular outlines, and dynamic compositional lines seemingly incompatible with the school." This painting, “Presidential Trompe L'oeil” surely fits that description. Although it has been suggested that his wife’s failing health prompted him to leave the art profession, this may not be the primary reason. Griffith was married in 1912; however, public records list him as a carpenter-builder earlier, from 1910 to 1926. Perhaps painting was more of a hobby, or his sales did not provide sufficient income. Also, Griffith continued to exhibit in New York City until the late 1920s, so he was still painting before and after his wife died in 1923. It is believed that the Griffiths first began visiting to Avon Park, FL circa 1920, likely due to his wife’s poor health. He became a permanent Avon Park resident circa 1926. Although retired, he pursued painting as a hobby and taught art classes. Artist Edward Norton Griffith was a member of the Society of Independent Artists (NYC) and the Irvington (New Jersey) Art and Camera Club. He exhibited at Society of Independent Artists (1917 – 1923 and 1926 - 1929). 

Call now to talk about your interest in this Edward Norton (E.N.) Griffith (American 1858 - 1948) painting:  724-459-0612 - Jerry Hawk, Bedford Fine Art Gallery


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Bedford Fine Art Gallery

Welcome to Bedford Fine Art Gallery. Located in historic Bedford, Pennsylvania, the gallery offers a wide variety of works from some of the greatest and most well-known 19th century artists, early 20th century artists, and contemporary realism artists. You can see all of our available 19th century artwork on our Gallery page. Our current inventory boasts a wide diversity of subject matter from landscape, marine, still life, genre, American historical/political, sporting art, and animal themes. Our gallery features both American and European 19th century painters such as John Henry Dolph, George Hetzel, William Bromley III, and Barton Stone Hays, to name a few. To see more of our 19th century artists, please visit our Artists page. Good art is timeless and only you know what "wows" you. You know it when you see it and we hope you make that connection with a stunning painting from Bedford Fine Art Gallery. Thank you.

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