'Women of the West' Redefines Stereotypes

  • BASALT, Colorado
  • /
  • August 08, 2018

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Donna Howell-Sickles, "Dancing With Elvis, " Acrylic on Canvas 36 x 36 in
Ann Korologos Gallery
Dinah Worman, "Hilltop Adobe," Oil on Canvas 12 x 12 in

Women of the West is a group exhibition capturing the many facets of Western women and its female artists featuring mixed media, oil painting, and sculpture by honored artists Donna Howell-SicklesDinah WormanVeryl GoodnightHeather Foster; introducing Tanya Bone. Artists’ Reception on Wednesday, August 8th, 2018 from 5 to 7PM at Ann Korologos Gallery in Basalt.

“When it comes to these women, they each embody the West in their own way, and together create a powerful comparison in their work and their lives,” reflects gallery owner, Ann Korologos. “Western Women tend to be put in boxes, but Women of the West shows just how diverse that image, these women, are.”

Donna Howell-Sickles redefines the wary stereotypes that represented Western women during her childhood in Texas and New Mexico in the 50s and 60s. Using charcoal, pastel, and acrylic on paper or canvas, Donna portrays ranching women as she knew them—strong, capable, humorous and bonded as sisters. Her work is rich with symbolism and allusions to classical mythology that that “fits the American West like a glove.”

Heather Foster of Santa Fe, New Mexico, has been working on an Impressionistic cattle series for nearly a decade, visiting ranches and dairy farms, and capturing the personality of western livestock. Foster also captures the wild landscapes of Colorado, like her series of the Black Canyon near Gunnison. Foster enjoys showing evidence of the thought process of her work, leaving thechanges and refinements in drawing and the composition evident on the canvas

Heather Foster, "Mountain Magie," Acrylic on Canvas, 36 x 36 in

Veryl Goodnight is a Colorado native whose love for animals and the American West have been the focus of her art for over 30 years. Veryl has applied the style of 19th century genre painters who depict ordinary lives of common people to the lives of working animals and the wild ones around the fringes –sled dogs, livestock guardian dogs, burros, fauns and foxes. Traditionally, Goodnight first explores a subject through sculpture to better understand the form when painting in oil, her primary medium.

Dinah Worman creates representational yet imaginative variations in oil that focus on the human relationship to the landscape. Instantly recognizable for its clarity, depth, and quality of light, Worman’s work shows the interaction of man and nature in the contemporary “Wild West” of New Mexico and neighboring Colorado. Dinah sees the landscape as one might see an arranged still life, objects in relation to each other, but on a grand scale. This perspective of the landscape and dedication to self is what is to love about Dinah, not to mention her masterful use of oil and pastel to capture the light of the West.

Tanya Bone approaches still life paintings with a new way of perceiving, rendering, and exploring enduring and everyday themes. A child of the Canadian prairies who frequently visited her grandparents’ farm, elements of this life live through her work. Bone studied art at Emily Carr College of Art and Design, Langara College, and the Federation of Canadian Artists in Vancouver, British Columbia, where she received Great Distinction Status.

Women of the West will remain on view through August 27th, 2018. For more information, please visit the Ann Korologos Gallery at 211 Midland Avenue in Basalt, call 970.927.9668 or email art@korologosgallery.com.

Ann Korologos Gallery
211 Midland Ave
Ste 101
Basalt, Colorado
art@korologosgallery.com
970-927-9668
http://www.korologosgallery.com

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