Henry rifle, rare Lalique, Newlyn school find highlight Witherell's March 2-16 auction

  • SACRAMENTO, California
  • /
  • February 26, 2016

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A Model 1860 Henry rifle used in the Civil War is up for bid in Witherell's catalogue auction.
Witherell's

(Sacramento, Calif., January 20, 2016) -- A Model 1860 Henry Repeating Rifle that was manufactured in 1863 and sold to the federal government for use in the Civil War is one of the highlights of Witherell’s catalogue auction March 2 to 16, 2016.

The rifle was captured in October 1864 by Private James G. Sandidge of the 6th Louisiana Cavalry, who sent it home, and was later presented to Sandidge’s brother, George M. Sandidge also of the 6th Louisiana Cavalry, at the latter’s wedding in 1868.

The item came from the Arthur V. Crego collection, most of which was auctioned by Witherell’s in 2010.

This particular firearm came to Witherell’s again when the son, who had inherited it from the estate, decided to sell it.

Because of its historic significance in changing battles forever, Henry rifles are a sought-after antiques today in any condition.

For a battle-carried rifle, this Henry is in remarkable condition, estimated at $15/25,000.

Lalique Vase
A visit by Witherell’s chief operating officer, Brian Witherell, to a family in Arbuckle revealed one of the most exciting discoveries of this auction—a rare Bacchante’s vase.

A 1927 Bacchante vase with golden color make it a rare piece of Lalique glass in Witherell's auction.
Witherell's

The golden color of the figures in the opalescent glass vase makes it a very important early Lalique vase.

The Bacchante vase was originally introduced by the famed Rene Lalique in 1927—and are still available today—but pieces like this recently have sold at auction for more than $30,000.

Because it was part of the family treasures, the Bacchante vase was displayed in a china cabinet for nearly 100 years.

“It’s rare to hear of business titans in the Central Valley, but there are many of them in the area who funded and ran great companies,” said Brian Witherell, “Antiques Roadshow” appraiser and Witherell’s chief operating officer. “This family was one of them.”

With a conservative valuation of $15/25,000, Lalique enthusiasts wanting to add this rare vase to their collection would be getting a great addition at that price.

Vonnoh’s “Enthroned”
“Enthroned”, the famous bronze by Bessie Potter Vonnoh, is only the third example of this iconic artwork to surface, found during a visit to a Carmel consignor.

One model currently is displayed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; the other sold at Christie’s in 1996 for nearly $30,000.

Bessie Potter Vonnoh (1875-1955) studied with sculptors Lorado Taft at the Art Institute of Chicago and August Rodin while in Europe.

Besides “Enthroned,” Vonnoh’s best known sculpture today is the Frances Hodgson Burnett Memorial in Central Park.

The bronze was originally owned by Virginia Drew (1895-1965), who opened a Connecticut school at the turn of the century, and became part of the art collection of the family from Carmel.

With a low estimate of $15/25,000, this noteworthy piece would be perfect for the right collector.

Only 3 examples of this iconic Vonnoh bronze have surfaced. In March auction at Witherell's.
Witherell's

Newlyn School Find
A Frank Bramley, A.R.A., painting from the Newlyn School is another great find that may end up being the most valuable lot in the sale.

With the luminous sunset in the background and the bright color of the clouds used again in the faces of the family in the foreground, “Daddy’s Welcome” is a prime example of the Newlyn School.

Bramley (1857-1915) studied in England, before travelling to Antwerp and Venice to study, finally settling in Penzance, Cornwall.

The painting came from a family in south Sacramento County who had inherited a collection from their father of elaborately framed artwork.

Because the Bramley is the only standout in the collection, it looks like the collector may not have known the significance of the piece.

“Had the family not contacted us, this fine work of art may have been lost forever,” said Witherell.

Because of the A.R.A. initials, the painting can be dated between 1864 and 1911.

Because Bramley regularly exhibited at the royal Academy, genre scenes on par with the artist’s finest works have sold for six figures.

As such, the 44-by-32 inch painting, which appears to be in the original frame, could be worth much more than the estimated $8/12,000.

Red 1961 TR3
Sportscars like the red, 1961 Triumph TR3 Roadster is one of the hottest items in the auction.

With brown leather and velour interior with wooden steering wheel, this convertible would be perfect for anyone wanting to add some extra get-up-and-go to their life with a luxury, mid-century modern look in their wheels.

A 4-cylinder engine, dual carburetor, 4-speed manual transmission and floor shift makes this lovely ride a steal at a mere $8/12,000 estimate.

Founded in 1969, Witherell’s does appraisals and auctions of objects of value—from decorative arts and design to antiques and fine art.

Witherell’s places items globally through private sales, online auctions and the annual Witherell’s Old West Antiques Show in Grass Valley May 6 and 7, 2016.

For more information, please visit www.witherells.com.
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Witherell's
300 20th Street
Sacramento, California
info@witherells.com
916-455-4790
http://www.witherells.com
About Witherell's

Founded in 1969, Witherell’s does appraisals and auctions of objects of value—from decorative arts and design to antiques and fine art. Witherell’s places items globally through private sales, online auctions and the annual Witherell’s Old West Antiques Show in Grass Valley May 6 and 7, 2016.


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