Blog Posts tagged with American art

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John Frederick Kensett, "Shrewsbury River, New Jersey," 1859

Kensett's Keepsakes

Posted: July 06, 2011 14:55 Last Updated: | Paul G. Stein

In the 1850s through 1860, John Frederick Kensett painted a series of at least five landscapes of the "Shrewsbury River" (now the Navesink River) along the New Jersey shore. The paintings are striking in their design and yet convey an atmosphere of translucent calm, for which they are justifiably renowned. A splendid example is included in "Painting the American Vision," an exhibition of Hudson River School landscapes from the New York Historical Society, on view at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts starting July 30. The exhibition travels to the Columbia Museum of Art in C...


John Storrs, Figure Under a Tree, 1918-20

John Storrs: Machine Age Modernist

Posted: June 22, 2011 09:14 Last Updated: | Susan Teller

John Storrs: Machine-Age Modernist, is on view at the Grey Art Gallery of New York University, April 12 through July 9, 2011. There is a wonderful range of sculpture -- from cubist but still clearly figurative works, to stripped down, architectural-motif columns. There are several drawings, including some preparatory to commissions. As we were reminded in March, no visit to Chicago is complete without seeing Storr's Ceres, 1929, at the top of the Chicago Board of Trade Building. Reclining Figure Under a Tree, 1918-20 Wood engraving, 6 x 6 inches Unpublished illustration for...


Peggy Bacon, Djuna Barnes, about 1940

DJuna Barnes in Midnight in Paris

Posted: June 12, 2011 07:38 Last Updated: | Susan Teller

Peggy Bacon would have been so pleased to see her pal Djuna Barnes featured in Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris.  Now showing, the film opened May 11 in Cannes, of course.  Barnes (1892-1982), the American modernist writer, was part of Bacon's Greenwich Village crowd, and figures in Bacon's Off with Their Heads, published 1934. Link to Peggy Bacon show images: http://www.susantellergallery.com/cgi/STG_exh.pl?exh=exh_apr11 Link to site:   WWW.SUSANTELLERGALLERY.COM    


John S.  Jameson, "River and Mountains," circa 1860

The Prodigy

Posted: May 30, 2011 10:25 Last Updated: | Paul G. Stein

Sometimes a small painting can tell a big story.   Such is the case with a six-by-nine-inch landscape by John S. Jameson. The painting is on display at the Olana State Historic Site in Hudson, New York, in the new exhibition, "Rally 'Round the Flag: Frederic Edwin Church and the Civil War.” Born in 1842 in Hartford, John S. Jameson was a rising young star among the New York painters at the time of the Civil War. The patriotic tug of duty, however, changed his course. A prodigy in both art and music, Jameson attracted attention in the 1850s while just barely a teenager. His father wa...


Detail of an oil painting by Kazuo Shiraga

Anatomy of an Auction

Posted: May 24, 2011 15:25 Last Updated: | Bill Roland

As co-founders of Roland Auctions, Manhattan's newest auction house, my brother Rob and I face a recurring challenge. As soon as the property in the monthly auction is picked up, we have to start filling the gallery again.  It often takes weeks of intense appraisals and negotiations before we are able to offer high caliber fine art, antiques and decorations from Manhattan's premier apartments and estates. That's why I say we're in the business of building relationships. For instance, it required strong relationship building and negotiation skills to bring three exceptional colle...


Dorothy Browdy Kushner, Callas, 1978

Last Saturday, show ends Wednesday, May 25

Posted: May 20, 2011 11:52 Last Updated: | Susan Teller

  On View through Wednesday, May 25     DOROTHY BROWDY KUSHNER & ROBERT KUSHNER: RECONFIGURED FLORA   Mother and Son: Paintings, fabric pieces, and drawings -- from the 1930s to the 1970s   for Dorothy and from the 1970s to 2000 for Robert. Dorothy Browdy Kushner (1909-2000) and Robert Kushner (born 1949), mother and son, painted side by side, sharing a deep interest in the natural world. This show explores areas in which interest, methods, and styles, travel from parent to child and then occasionally back to parent.  ...


Harbor Sunset

The Joy and Peril of Self Promotion, or "The outdoor weekend show".

Posted: May 16, 2011 16:58 Last Updated: | Robin Wethe Altman

Definition of PERIL 1: exposure to the risk of being injured, destroyed, or lost. and this is the definition of the word "joy: a : the emotion evoked by well-being, success, or good fortune or by the prospect of possessing what one desires. As an artist, I have found that if I want to have a chance at success, good fortune or the prospect of possessing what I desire, I have to risk the possibility of being injured, destroyed or lost. An artist's life is not one of hiding in solitude and indulging in self expression. An artist's life demands that I must expose...


Oh Happy Day

Finding my Niche

Posted: May 16, 2011 12:09 Last Updated: | Robin Wethe Altman

As a younger artist I envisoned myself in prestigious galleries, accepting awards from people "on high". I soon lost patience with that. I found that what I love most is to create exactly the kind of art that my heart desires. I've had no problem finding people who love my work and buy it, and as far as I'm concerned, that's all that matters to me. I've always had a childlike quality to what I do. I used to try to "overcome" that, but now I embrace it. I am childlike. I love to see the world through my own lens, in the way I want to see it. My worst critics in life where all in my head. Th...


"She Dreams of San Francisco

Finding Myself, the "She" Series.

Posted: May 16, 2011 12:09 Last Updated: | Robin Wethe Altman

It took me many years to find a better sense of security. Not just years, but pain. Pain is a good thing. It tells you that something isn’t right. I did all sorts of things to avoid the pain, but until I stepped forward and claimed myself, I didn’t get my release. On a spiritual level it’s about “self-realization”. I love that term because it signifies that what transformation is about is the realization! The realization of who you really are. It’s not about becoming something “else”. It’s about peeling off a skin that doesn’t fit you anymore. What’s underneath has always been there. One w...


She's An Artist

Today

Posted: May 16, 2011 12:09 Last Updated: | Robin Wethe Altman

I have overcome a lot of insecurities in the last 10 years. I don't know what the future holds, but I feel confident that I will be just fine. I love my life!


Morning Coffee at the Beach House

East Coast Beach Life

Posted: May 16, 2011 12:09 Last Updated: | Robin Wethe Altman

   I grew up in an art colony by the sea and I have a fondness for the mentality of "beach people". Beach people value relaxation. I've painted Laguna Beach for years since it is my home. I've also traveled to Hawaii several times and painted Island seascapes. Now I'm enjoying the experience of the East Coast beaches. What I like about them is the subtlety of the colors there and the openness of the beaches. There's a Zen feeling on the East Coast beaches. There are fewer colors available, so these paintings are more restful. In this series I'm accentuating the delicious feelin...


Heisler Park

Emotions Are Indicators

Posted: May 16, 2011 12:09 Last Updated: | Robin Wethe Altman

Artists are capable of intense emotions. That's something I've had to navigate in life over and over. They say the "sensitive" in a herd of animals is the one who senses danger first and alerts the rest which is a good thing, but high sensitivity can also drive a person completely insane. What I finally learned to do after many years of suffering is, yes... be aware of my emotions because they inform me. I don't suppress emotion, but I let it serve as guidance. I'm careful to not indulge in negative thoughts for too long though, because that habbit almost destroyed my life at one time. Whe...


She Walks the Vineyard

Finding Alphonse Mucha

Posted: May 16, 2011 12:09 Last Updated: | Robin Wethe Altman

I was in Barnes and Noble one day and found a book about Alphonse Mucha. I didn't know much about this artist before finding and reading the book. Although I did take art appreciation and art history classes in college, I was far more interested in my own self discovery than I was in other artists. I think a lot of us artists are self absorbed. But anyway, I am impressed by his sense of design and line work. I also love the way he portrays women. Alphones's women are classy women though feminine as well. I decided to allow myself to experiment with a little of his flavor in my painting, "S...


A Day at the Beach

Thoughts on How to Make a Living As An Artist

Posted: May 16, 2011 12:09 Last Updated: | Robin Wethe Altman

I have had the most success through my personal sales at art shows where the artist sells their own work. This way I have a connection to my clients that I wouldn't have through a gallery. Galleries are nice, but you can't count on them. If you are in a gallery and sell your own work as well, avoid selling your work for less than the gallery does no matter how tempting it is. 1. Have a mailing list!!! Get people who even stop and look for a few minutes to sign it. 2. Get "Constant Contact" a newsletter that goes to your clients once a month. Write your thoughts and sh...


Sunrise in Idyllwild

A Weekend In The Mountains

Posted: May 16, 2011 12:09 Last Updated: | Robin Wethe Altman

I could have pushed myself to work last weekend.  I didn't think I could afford to take a trip. But one thing I know is that life is for living. I don't think I will say on my death bed, "I WISH I would have created 20 more paintings". An artist NEEDS to take time to drink in the beauty of life, take time to observe, to breath, taste, smell and feel. That's part of our work! I did that last weekend with my partner Paul who had 4 gigs in the mountains, enough to make it worth his while to go. We were provided a rustic cabin to stay in and there was a fresh snowfall up there. O...


Fine Art Daily, London flower stall, irises

Fine Art Daily, May 12, 2011

Posted: May 12, 2011 05:06 Last Updated: | Jean Dixon Sanders

May 12, 2011 Miss Morning Glory can grow irises in Florida, but I can't. I have to be content with my ongoing hydrangea experiment. If I was a wandering hiker in Scotland right now I would be enthralled by the magic that comes with bluebells, which have been duly noted by our intrepid Highlanders stalking the Great Glen Way. And if I were in London I would be joining the scrum of garden folks, queuing up for tickets to the Chelsea Flower Show. Sigh.


Fine Art Daily, pansies and geraniums

Fine Art Daily, May 11, 2011

Posted: May 11, 2011 05:12 Last Updated: | Jean Dixon Sanders

May 11, 2011 It is starting to heat up here, and some of the spring flowers are gasping for coolth. The pansies incinerated a few weeks ago. We had a cheerful purple-y display near the front door in a chartreuse trapezoid of a pot. This morning I noticed that the petunia that I was ready to toss had put out two more brave pink trumpets. I'll stick it in the shade with the orchids, which are just going to town with exuberance. I guess I finally hit upon the right mix of shade, watering and benign neglect. Two of the orchids are from my cubicle days and were used to arctic blasts of ...


Fine Art Daily, London flower stall

Fine Art Daily, May 10, 2011

Posted: May 10, 2011 05:39 Last Updated: | Jean Dixon Sanders

May 10, 2011 It's Spring with many blooming flowers. In my garden here in oh-so-warm-already Florida the hydrangeas soldier on bravely with their companion penta, vinca and something blue and spikey (I'll have to ask Miss Morning Glory what they are called)along with the bougainvillea (which have just been spectacular this year) and the oleanders. The container garden is a riot of blues and pinks - for once the lobilia have not burned to a crisp! The nasturtium are toast, however, and I really need to cut them back. The Evil Roxanne and Thuggie Hoover know that they are in for a c...


Fine Art Daily, St.  Michaels, MD

Fine Art Daily, May 5, 2011

Posted: May 05, 2011 04:49 Last Updated: | Jean Dixon Sanders

May 5, 2011 These are some houses along the water in St. Michaels, Maryland. I think I am getting a little too cynical in my dotage. I still look at hilly fields and wonder how they would be in the winter, if they would be good for sledding or if the grasses would become a drag factor. This is good, because we have lived in Florida for almost 20 years and the snow days here have been very few and far between... Now I look at these enviable houses, with their well-tended gardens, lacy gingerbread, inviting sleeping porches and their water views and wonder how much their flood insura...


Fine Art Daily, Historical Society of Talbot County

Fine Art Daily, May 4, 2011

Posted: May 04, 2011 04:53 Last Updated: | Jean Dixon Sanders

May 4, 2011 When you walk around Easton, which is always a delightful proposition, you can find all manner of interesting routes. This is an almost secret garden tucked in near the Historical Society of Talbot County, which should, of course, be on your agenda. There is a crazy quilt of brickwork, fragrant boxwoods and the perky little avian detail on the wrought iron fence. The Historical Society building is red brick, edged in purple, so you shouldn't have any trouble finding it!


Fine Art Daily, Academy Art Museum

Fine Art Daily, May 3, 2011

Posted: May 03, 2011 04:52 Last Updated: | Jean Dixon Sanders

May 3, 2011 We have been busy with the launch of The Talbot Spy. I hope you'll get a chance to visit the site, and perhaps "Like" us on Facebook. The Eastern Shore of Maryland is thriving with culture, nature,food,gardens, boats, views, vistas and fascinating people. One of our readers said it pithily, "Every town needs a Spy." This seemingly austere building houses the Academy Art Museum in Easton. One almost expects Grant Wood's dentist and his sister to be the docents. Don't let the exterior fool you. Inside is a world of color and imagination.


Sketch Class at the League, 1919

PEGGY BACON SHOW ENDS SATURDAY

Posted: April 28, 2011 09:51 Last Updated: | Susan Teller

PEGGY BACON: DRAWINGS AND PRINTS, 1915 THROUGH 1976   LAST WEEK, ENDS SATURDAY, APRIL 30   The Peggy Bacon show runs through Saturday. From Union Square soap box speakers, to Art Students League studios, to audience and beach crowd scenes, to children’s book illustrations and relaxing felines -- no one does it like she does! There are drawings, drypoints, lithographs, and one fabulous embroidery.     The entire show may be viewed under Exhibitions at WWW.SUSANTELLERGALLERY.COM  


Monty at Westminster Abbey

Fine Art Daily, April 28, 2011

Posted: April 28, 2011 05:29 Last Updated: | Jean Dixon Sanders

April 28, 2011 Monty here. Back at the Palace, but yesterday we went on an outing! I can't tell you how exciting it was! We went in the Roller! (Sometimes I find dropped sweeties in the cushions...) We had a little walkabout at the Abbey. The detectives needed some of my expertise in sniffing the area, to make sure the crack team of Metropolitan Police Dogs had done their jobs. And of course, all was well. I particularly enjoyed a little snackum of Twiglets just behind the gift shop! The choir boys were singing up a storm, much to Kate's delight. It sounded like a lot of caterwauli...


Fine Art Daily, Royal Wedding Hat, corgi

Fine Art Daily, April 27, 2011

Posted: April 27, 2011 04:31 Last Updated: | Jean Dixon Sanders

April 27, 2011 Monty here, upstairs today. HM is having a devil of a time deciding which hat to wear on Friday. Philip Treacy has designed some spun-sugar confections for her approval, and her favored milliner, Freddie Fox, has some very attractive designs, as usual. But we are hoping she picks our Linnet's inspired design. It is an homage to Alexander McQueen, Izzy Blow and the beautiful and loyal troops of corgis who have amused and served HM through the years. See is you can find me in the delicious kennel of corgis encircling HM's head! (I don't see the nuisance of royal cats d...


Your own Royal Wedding bunting

Fine Art Daily, April 26, 2011

Posted: April 26, 2011 05:07 Last Updated: | Jean Dixon Sanders

April 26, 2011 Monty here, reporting from London. I am below stairs today, helping Cook with some of the decorations for the staff quarters. She has been so busy, starting to create 90,000 canapés for the parties here on Friday. You have no idea how much work goes into canapé construction! The salmon! The pâtés! The créme fraiche! The caviar! The taramasalata! And Vol-au-vent! A veritable smörgåsbord, and who do you suppose does the taste testing? Well, of course Wills and Kate have a tiny say in the day's choices, and so does HM. But HM relies on me! Those other dogs are rubbish! ...


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