Museum Featuring Westervelt CEO Jack Warner's Collection Will Close, and More Art Sold

“Dawn Before Gettysburg” by Edward Hopper (1882-1967)
“Dawn Before Gettysburg” by Edward Hopper (1882-1967)
(Tuscaloosa Museum of Art)
  • Thomas Cole’s 1826 “The Falls of Kaaterskill,” formerly in the Westervelt Co.  collection and possibly sold to a private collection.

    Thomas Cole’s 1826 “The Falls of Kaaterskill,” formerly in the Westervelt Co. collection and possibly sold to a private collection.

    Wikimedia Commons

The Tuscaloosa Museum of Art in Alabama, housing the renowned collection of 17th-20th century American and Asian fine art, furniture and decorative arts formed by the late Westervelt Company CEO Jack Warner, will close on Aug. 31.

In a statement the museum noted: "While The Westervelt Company will maintain a core selection of art, most notably early American and nature themed pieces, the remaining collection will be prepared for shipment." 

"Works from the collection will be prepared for shipment to private buyers," ARTFIXdaily was told by Susan Poole, corporate communications manager for the Westervelt Company.

Warner died last year at age 99. From the 1950s, he was CEO and chairman of Gulf States Paper Corp., which became the Westervelt Co. after his retirement. He ceded control of the company (and its art collection) to his son.

Warner had employed corporate (and some personal funds) over several decades to create one of the greatest private collections of American art, featuring seminal Hudson River School, Impressionist and Modernist paintings; notable Duncan Phyfe furniture; and more. The exquisite landscape by Frederic Edwin Church, “Above the Clouds at Sunrise” was the cover image of the 2002 book/exhibition catalog An American Odyssey about Warner's collection.

The Westervelt Warner Museum of American Art housed thousands of artworks from 2002 until 2011, and then the collection was partly deaccessioned and the rest moved to the corporation's Tuscaloosa Museum of Art.

Many key artworks in the collection were sold off, at Christie's in May 2011 (16 of 29 lots offered did not sell) and in private sales, including Asher B. Durand’s “Progress (The Advance of Civilization),” Thomas Cole’s “The Falls of Kaaterskill,” Daniel Garber’s “Tanis" (subsequently gifted by Marguerite and Gerry Lenfest to Philadelphia Museum of Art), and Frederick Carl Frieseke's "Sunspots.

Read more about Warner's collection and the saga of two paintings on Paul Stein's blog post from 2014, "Two American Treasures, Sold."

More News Feed Headlines

Gordon Parks, "Trapped in abandoned building by a rival gang on street, Red Jackson ponders his next move," 1948, gelatin silver print, part of the exhibition "Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950" at the National Gallery of Art through Feb.  18, 2019.

Virtually Browse (and Support) the 20 Museums Closed by the Government Shutdown

  • January 15, 2019 22:41

With the 19 federally-funded Smithsonian museums and the National Gallery of Art in DC closed due ...

Read More

Still from video by Klaus Obermeyer/Rocket.film, 'Letting the light in, James Turrell, ASU partner on artwork'

James Turrell's 'Roden Crater' Project Gets $10 Million Donation from Kanye West

  • January 14, 2019 14:50

James Turrell, 75, began his Roden Crater Project in 1977. The California artist has gotten a ...

Read More

Dr Bendor Grosvenor in an episode of Britain's Lost Masterpieces (with Emma Dabiri).  (The painting shown is not the one destroyed by cat.)

Art Expert Says Cat Destroyed His Rare 17th-Century Painting

  • January 10, 2019 14:03

A cat wrecked a rare 17th-century portrait painting, according to the pet's owner, UK-based art ...

Read More

Artforum cover

Lawsuit Dismissed Against Artforum and Knight Landesman in #MeToo Case

  • January 05, 2019 13:51

A New York State Supreme Court judge has dismissed a lawsuit against Knight Landesman, the ...

Read More

Related Press Releases

Related Events from ArtfixDaily Calendar

 

ArtfixDaily Artwire