Supreme Court Rules Against Terrorism Victims Who Sought Items From Chicago Museums

Field Museum
Field Museum
(Wikipedia)

The Supreme Court denied a transfer of Persian artifacts from Chicago museums to U.S. survivors of a 1997 terrorist attack as part of a court judgment against Iran.

The court ruled 8-0 Wednesday against the victims of the suicide bombing in Jersualem.

The victims sought to claim Iran's artifacts at Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History and the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute as part of a $71.5 million default judgment against Iran, which they say gave aid and support to Hamas, the group that carried out the attack.

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