Artist's WPA-Style Works of National Parks Imagine Effects of Climate Change in 2050

Hannah Rothstein, National Parks 2050
Hannah Rothstein, National Parks 2050
Hannah Rothstein, National Parks 2050
Hannah Rothstein, National Parks 2050
  • Hannah Rothstein, National Parks 2050

    Hannah Rothstein, National Parks 2050

Berkeley-based artist Hannah Rothstein has created a series of vintage-style posters illustrating the effects of climate change on National Parks by 2050. Her images evoke government-funded 1930s art posters for the national park system - just with bleaker renditions of the landscapes. Despite the grim outlook, the artist says her series is a "call to action" to help motivate people to reduce carbon pollution and protect the environment.

Depression-weary Americans were inspired to visit National Parks after the Works Progress Administration (WPA) printed compelling posters celebrating the natural beauty of the land. Made between 1938 and 1941, these posters made popular sites like Old Faithful, the Grand Canyon and the coastal Redwoods.

Rothstein's works show how rising global temperatures, loss of sea ice, accelerated sea level rise and ocean acidfication stemming from climate change will cause increased wildfires, flooding and other threats to wildlife and the ecosystems of the national park system.

The series can be printed for signs for Saturday's People's Climate March in Washington, DC, and across the country, according to the artist's website. A portion of sales from prints will also be donated to climate-related causes.

Rothstein writes:

"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." -Aldous Huxley

National Parks 2050 is a call to action. Drawing upon the classic National Parks posters, this series shows how climate change will affect seven of America’s most beloved landscapes. In doing so, it makes climate change feel close to home and hard to ignore.

We have the ability to outsmart the issues highlighted in National Parks 2050, but we need to act now. From Franklin to Fuller, America has been made its greatest by embracing ingenuity and innovation. If we dive headfirst into inventing for a brighter future, we can prevent National Parks 2050 from becoming a reality.

I hope the series inspires everyone, from every day citizens to policy makers, to acknowledge the issues ahead, admit that climate stewardship is a non-partisan issue, and work together to find the solutions I know we’re capable of creating.

More News Feed Headlines

Renoir, La Maison d’Essoyes (1906).  Private Collection.

Restored Renoir Home Will Open to the Public in June

  • May 24, 2017 14:38

A family home of French Impressionist Pierre-Auguste Renoir will open to the public on June 3 ...

Read More

Military man and his daughter looking at art at San Antonio Museum of Art, in the program Blue Star Museums, a collaboration among the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense, and more than 2,000 museums across America to offer free admission to the nation’s service members.

Trump's Official Budget Proposal Eliminates NEA

  • May 23, 2017 15:16

Similar to a "blueprint" set forth in March, President Donald Trump's official 2018 budget ...

Read More

"The Apollo Blue" earring went for $42.1 million, and "The Artemis Pink" diamond sold for $15.3 million.

Pair of Diamond Earrings Fetch Record $57.4 Million

  • May 17, 2017 15:07

A mis-matched pair of fancy colored diamond earrings sold together for $57.4 million at a Geneva ...

Read More

Constantin Brancusi, La muse endormie (1913)

Brancusi Fetches Record-Setting $57 Million, Nazi-Seized Picasso Makes $45 Million at Christie's

  • May 16, 2017 20:32

New York's auction "gigaweek" is underway with Impressionist, Modern, and contemporary art ...

Read More

Related Press Releases

Related Events from ArtfixDaily Calendar

 

ArtfixDaily Artwire