Chinese Authorities Destroy Fake Terracotta Army at Bogus Attraction

The real terracotta army
The real terracotta army
(Wikimedia)

A site with 40 copies of the famed terracotta warriors was demolished by Chinese authorities in a raid on Wednesday, according to reports.

Tourists were confused, with one posting an online complaint, when they were duped into visiting the underwhelming, copycat attraction in the Lintong District, Xi'an, Shaanxi province. Unlicensed guides and illegal taxi services were in on the scam.

The real Mausoleum of Qinshihuang holds 7,000 terracotta warriors along with horses and chariots. Discovered in 1974, the mausoleum of Emperor Qin Shi Huang Di, founder of the Qin Dynasty (221-206 BC), attracts droves of visitors from around the world.

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