4 Ways Technology Has Altered the Museum Visit

Björk Digital is an immersive virtual reality exhibition from the Icelandic icon Björk, at Somerset House in London, through Oct.  23, 2016.
Björk Digital is an immersive virtual reality exhibition from the Icelandic icon Björk, at Somerset House in London, through Oct. 23, 2016.

The Atlantic breaks down four ways museums will be, and already are, adapting to the digital age.

1. Cellphones are no longer shunned at museums and are used for social media sharing, "selfies," navigating galleries, and more...

Atlantic: Embracing cellphones also means that more art galleries will curate immersive, Instagram-friendly exhibitions. [Ie.,] The staggering success of the Museum of Modern Art’s Rain Room, a moody gray space illuminated by falling water...

2. Virtual Reality and apps make museum visits an interactive experience

Atlantic: In museums, augmented reality might mean an app that brings paintings to life via your phone’s camera, or that encourages visitors to learn about history by competing to “collect” artifacts or experiences.

3. Collections viewable online

Atlantic: In July, Google updated its Arts & Culture app, allowing people with Google Cardboard headsets to “tour” 20 museums and historic sites around the world. Perhaps one day, some museums won’t have a physical presence at all.

4. Art that adapts to the viewer

Atlantic: A new exhibition at London’s Somerset House about the singer and artist Björk uses virtual reality to let visitors experience her music on a deserted beach in Iceland, or even inside Björk’s mouth while she’s performing.

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