Art Loss Register to Face New Rival

  • American soldiers recover a Nazi-looted painting by Manet.

    American soldiers recover a Nazi-looted painting by Manet.

    Keystone

Art Loss Register general counsel Christopher A. Marinello has left the company to start a rival business called Art Recovery International.

Based in London, the new company will focus on stolen, lost and looted art, similar to Art Loss Register. Art recovery and title disputes are the primary focus. Provenance research and due diligence on artworks will also be services offered by a team of professionals assembled by Marinello.

Marinello said in a statement, "We are also working with a number of developers to build what will be the most comprehensive central database of stolen and looted artwork, title disputes, fakes and forgeries, and works that may be subject to financial security interests."

http://www.artrecovery.com is currently under construction.

More News Feed Headlines

Anish Kapoor's ‘Descent into Limbo (1992)’

Museum Visitor Falls Into Anish Kapoor's 8-Foot 'Descent Into Limbo'

  • August 20, 2018 18:54

A museum visitor descended 8 feet into Anish Kapoor's Descent Into Limbo installation in Portugal ...

Read More

Ai Weiwei's Life Cycle (2018) will be on view at the non-profit Marciano Art Foundation in LA.

Ai Weiwei's New Work 'Life Cycle' Debuts in L.A. This Fall

  • August 19, 2018 22:57

Marciano Art Foundation will present a solo exhibition of Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, on view from ...

Read More

An 18th century lacquer box that was stolen from the Chinese Pavilion of the Swedish Royal Palace Drottningholm in 2010

GQ Investigates the Rise in Chinese Art Thefts Worldwide

  • August 19, 2018 20:53

GQ sent writer Alex W. Palmer to investigate the sharp increase in Chinese art heists at museums ...

Read More

Kate Ballis, 'Sheats Goldstein', 2017.  Archival pigment print

Kate Ballis's 'Hypercolour Fantasy: Infra Realism' Depicts California in a Whole New Light

  • August 16, 2018 13:10

Felicity Carter writes in Forbes: At first sight, the work of Kate Ballis may not look like ...

Read More

 

ArtfixDaily Artwire