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Titanic Auctions Mark Disaster's 100th Anniversary

11 April 2012
  • Original Titanic launch ticket will be offered by Bonhams on April 15, 2012.  The estimate is $50,000-70,000.

    Original Titanic launch ticket will be offered by Bonhams on April 15, 2012. The estimate is $50,000-70,000.

One hundred years ago, on April 14, the supposedly unsinkable Titanic hit an iceberg in the North Atlantic, resulting in one of the world's worst sea disasters. Auctions commemorating the tragedy this week offer up a poignant array of artifacts related to the ship.

More than 5,000 artifacts recovered from the Titanic wreck site are part of a closed bid auction this week. Offered as one lot are such items as White Star Line china and the ship's logometer to measure speed.

Premier Exhibitions, Inc., which has exclusive rights to the Titanic wreck, and is selling the artifacts to one buyer through Guernsey's, announced "that it is in discussions with multiple parties for the purchase of its Titanic artifacts collection." A press conference scheduled for Wed. was postponed.

The collection has been valued at over $189 million.

On April 15, Bonhams auction house in New York will offer other items linked to the ill-fated ocean liner. An original Titanic launch ticket, currently valued at between $50,000 and $70,000; memorabilia related to Titanic films; letters from survivors; and R.M.S. Carpathia’s rescue account of Titanic survivors (est. $90,000-$120,000) will be on the block.


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