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Google Accelerates Art Project

8 April 2012
  • Head of Aphrodite (Bartlett Head), Greek, 330–300 BC.

    Head of Aphrodite (Bartlett Head), Greek, 330–300 BC.

    Image: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Google Inc. has expanded its Art Project to include more than 150 museums worldwide, among them 29 museums in 16 US cities.

Recent additions to Google's virtual tours of museum collections include the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Musee d'Orsay in Paris, and Jerusalem's Israel Museum.

The world's most-visited museum, the Louvre, has not signed on yet, but Google is talking to the museum for possible inclusion in the "next phase."

Galleries in 40 countries can now be viewed by Internet users. High resolution close-ups of masterpieces by the likes of Monet and Botticelli are available.

A robot-like device rolled through the museums recording as many as 30,000 artworks to be viewed much like Google's Street Views.

The Art Project launched in February 2011.

Visit the website at http://www.googleartproject.com.

 


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