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Book presents artists' to-do lists, inner thoughts

14 July 2011
  • A page from Lists: To-dos, Illustrated Inventories, Collected Thoughts, and Other Artists' Enumerations from the Collections of the Smithsonian Museum.

    A page from Lists: To-dos, Illustrated Inventories, Collected Thoughts, and Other Artists' Enumerations from the Collections of the Smithsonian Museum.

Lists: To-dos, Illustrated Inventories, Collected Thoughts, and Other Artists' Enumerations from the Collections of the Smithsonian Museum gives an inside look into the lives some of the 20th century's most remarkable artists—including Pablo Picasso, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, Hans Hoffman, Mark Rothko, and Andrew Wyeth, among dozens of others, and reveals their creative processes and even some humorous details about everyday life.

Among the interesting tid-bits is Picasso's recommendations of artists he liked for Walt Kuhn's 1913 Armory Show.

Within the seeming mundane inclusions is Franz Kline's receipt from a New York liquor store. He had a hefty total.

Lists: To-dos, Illustrated Inventories, Collected Thoughts, and Other Artists' Enumerations from the Collections of the Smithsonian Museum (Princeton Architectural Press: 2010)


Categories: American art, american art

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