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1913 Indianapolis 500 Mile Race Sweepstakes Trophy at Antique Helper Auctions

Published: October 04, 2012 12:08 Last Updated: October 04, 2012 12:06
  • Indianapolis 500 presentation frame by Heintz Art Metal Smiths, 1913

    So, it should come as no surprise that we were literally blown away when we heard about the Eighth Place Driver’s Trophy from the Third Annual Indianapolis 500 Mile Sweepstakes in 1913.

    Antique Helper Auctions

  • Louis Disbrow

    The Case entry was driven by Louis Disbrow (pictured left, ca. 1914). Disbrow was a pioneer of auto racing. In fact, he continued to race until he was well in his 50s. In the meantime, he kept busy as a garage owner, aviator and racing car and boat builde

We have had the privilege to offer some fantastic Indy 500 and auto racing-related treasures over the years. Thanks to the Duesenberg and Clarence Cagle Estates, and the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to work with retired racer Jigger Sirois, we have all become, in some shape or form, race fans.

For many of us, racing has always been a big deal. For others, it’s been the collections and rich history of auto racing that served as the bait. We can unequivocally state that we all love auto racing and all of the interesting and amazing bits and pieces of memorabilia that go with it.

The Original 1909 Poster from the inaugruar auto race at the Indianapolis Motor Sppedway from the Cagle Estate had everything—looks, style, and a rich history. It brought a hammer price of $24,000.

So, it should come as no surprise that we were literally blown away when we heard about the Eighth Place Driver's Trophy from the Third Annual Indianapolis 500 Mile Sweepstakes in 1913. the  

1913? Of course, we were instantly and madly in love with the historic value of the piece.

 Check out the facts:

The Third Annual Indianapolis 500 Mile Race, also known as the International 500-mile Sweepstakes Race, took place On Friday, May 30, 1913.
Coming in Eighth Place was a  Case automobile,  finishing with a time of 7:29:09:00The Eighth place winner was entered by the J.I Case T. M. Company. (By the way, the Case Company built the very first steam powered car in 1878. The 1913 model ran on petrol fuel, of course) The Case Corporation, known for manufacturing agricultural machinery, produced automobiles from 1911-1925/26. The Case entry was driven by Louis Disbrow (pictured left, ca. 1914). Disbrow was a pioneer of auto racing. In fact, he continued to race until he was well in his 50s. In the meantime, he kept busy as a garage owner, aviator and racing car and boat builder before becoming a race official. Waiting in the wings was Relief Driver H.J. Kilpatrick, on the chance that  he was needed to take the wheel of the Case car in 1913. On top of that, a mechanic rode in the car along with the driver. 

History was teasing us, and we liked it.

Then, we got a gander at the thing. And, holy smoke! It is beautiful!

The rare and wonderful trophy, produced by the Heintz Art Metal Smiths features Art Nouveau styling with sterling silver overlay adorning the bronze racing trophy from the “Indianapolis Moter Speedway," complete with the IMS winged logo.

The frame displays a panoramic photograph of the IMS track with crowd and pit crews on race day, and is also inscribed in sterling silver overlay with car (Case), owner Alex Sloan, driver Louis Disbrow and relief driver, H.J. Kilpatrick.

The piece is special enough as a bit of IMS history. But, add to this history the fact that it was manufactured by the Heintz Art Metal Company, and you just turned the Big Appeal-enator up to full blast.

Heintz Art Metal Company facts:

Otto Heintz was born into a family of manufacturing jewelers.
 He purchased a small company that he renamed The Art Crafts Shop; he began producing copper items with enamel decoration around 1902.
By 1906, he was producing objects in bronze, with sterling silver ornamentation.  In August of 1912, Heintz was granted a patent for applying silver to bronze—the technique used to craft the trophy offered at Antique Helper on October 13.

Heintz Art Metal frames are highly sought after among collectors, though examples are typically much smaller than this special order. The large scale frame offered in Antique Helper’s October 13 Art and Antiques Auction is unusual in size and noteworthy in subject matter. Similar trophies for third and fifth place from the 1913 race can reportedly be found at The Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum. Each known example is a one-of-a-kind piece, produced by Heintz Art Metal Company for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

The Third Annual Indy 500 Eighth Place driver's trophy in presentation frame by Heintz Art Metal Shop is estimated between $5,000 and $7,000 at Antique Helper's October 13 Art & Antiques Auction.

It is an impressive thing to behold. Whether you plan to be a bidder or you're simply curious, we encourage you to stop by the preview and take a look at this show stopper of a piece.


  Preview Thursday, October 11 2-5 PM and Friday, October 12 10-5 PM.

Contact us about telephone, absentee and Internet bidding options.

 

 



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