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The Art of Marketing the Fine Arts

Regina Kolbe

Regina Kolbe is President of PR To the Trade, a public relations firm for small businesses, particularly those that serve the art world. Clients include auction galleries, appraisers, show promoters, gallerists, antique dealers and museums.

A public relations blog that offers advice on maximizing your marketing opportunities.

Blog entries from The Art of Marketing the Fine Arts

Wei Dynasty Bodhisattva.  Stone.  Lot 148.  Gianguan Auctions, June 10 sale.

The Wow Factor in Wei Dynasty Buddhist Art

Posted: June 05, 2017 11:29

Early Buddhist art has always attracted attention the attention of collectors, and now, partly because of its rarity,  more than ever before.   Buddhism, brought to China nearly 2,000 years ago, spread region by region to become the country's most accepted religious philosophy. Why? Well, you have the Wei to thank for that. The Wei Dynasty [386-535] which was founded by the nomadic Tuoba tribesmen who (although their nationalistic origins are unknown, spoke a form of Turkish) were great patrons of Buddhism. The philisophy brought forth univeralist ethics, a chraracteristic that gave...

Northern Wei (386-535AD) stone Bodhisattva, in an unusual seated asana with crossed ankles and hands in mudras “fear not” and “charity.” 11” tall.  Some remaining pigment.  captures.  Gianguan Auctions, Lot 148, June 10, 2017.

Buddhist Art Bootcamp

Posted: May 26, 2017 10:27

Like so many of the Chinese arts, China’s ultra elite have driven the demand for Buddhist art to new highs.  While the ultimate intention of the works may be to encourage serenity, harmony, meditation and study,  disruption in the sales room is not uncommon as bidding wars escalate. There are still occassions to acquire fine Buddhist sculpture at more reasonable prices, if you know the ropes. The most expensive Chinese work to sell at auction was a 15th-century embroidered thangka painting with direct links to the Imperial Court. It went off in 2014 at Christie’s for $45M (around £29M)....

 

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