Favorite Chinese Painters & Ceremonial Objects at Gianguan Auctions

  • Lot 119.  Liu Cai’s “Carp in Spring Pond,” a Song Dynasty masterwork.  At Gianguan Auctions December 10.

    Lot 119. Liu Cai’s “Carp in Spring Pond,” a Song Dynasty masterwork. At Gianguan Auctions December 10.

  • Lot 57.  "Flower" by Song Meiling, 20th C.  At Gianguan Auctions, December 10.

    Lot 57. "Flower" by Song Meiling, 20th C. At Gianguan Auctions, December 10.

  • Lot 163.  Ouija culture ritual jade spade.  14" blade.  Handle inlaid with turquoise taotie mask.  At Gianguan Auctions, December 10.

    Lot 163. Ouija culture ritual jade spade. 14" blade. Handle inlaid with turquoise taotie mask. At Gianguan Auctions, December 10.

An unusually strong collection of Chinese paintings and archaic ritual items take the podium on December 10 at Gianguan Auctions, New York City.

Leading the classic scroll paintings is a Liu Cai’s “Carp in Spring Pond,” a Song Dynasty masterwork of fluidity and motion that depicts fish among water lily pads and leaves. With frontispiece by Hu Mei, Colophon by Ma Yuanyu, the ink-on-paper, Lot 119, is set to command $300,000-$400,000.

Song Meiling, popularly known as Madame Chang, painted “Flower.” Schooled in the United States at Wellesley College, she was a dedicated painter as well as political figure. The ink-and-color on paper is signed Meiling, with one artist seal. It is Lot 57, expected to create interest at $20,000-$30,000.

Embodying the spiritual precepts that dominate Chinese life, “Returning Home with the Immortal Spirit” is by Fu Baoshi. Dated 1962, inscribed and signed, with one artist seal, Lot 121 is valued at $200,000-$300,000.

A collection of paintings by famous artists celebrates women.  Among them, Liu Jiyou’s “Girls Riding Buffalo,” Lot 59, $15,000-$20,000. It joins Lin Fengmian's, “Beauty in Blue,”  Lot 114, Fu Baoshi’s 1945 work “Two Ladies," and Lot 58,Liu Wenxi ’s 1982 “Flower Girl.” The presale estimates range from $5,000 to $30,000.

Highlights of the ritual and ceremonial objects place the spotlight on several early cultures. Lot 163, is a Ouija  jade spade with 14" blade and a  handle inlaid with turquoise tesserae in the form of a taotie mask. It weighs nearly four-pounds and is estimated at $50,000-$80,000. 

From the Liangzhu culture of the Yangtze River Delta, Lot 151 is a highly prized white jade hexagonal cylinder, or zong. Ten ascending segments are decorated with zoomorphic masks and eyes. At 19" tall, it weighs eighteen pounds and is valued at $30,000-$40,000. 

The Hongshan peoples of Northwest China are represented by Lot 178, a curvilinear white jade carving of a dancer with dragon motifs. It is 15" tall, weighs about four pounds and is estimated at $20,000-$30,000.

The Warring States period of the Zhou Dynasty produced Lot 168, a mythical beast of gilt-silver and gold inlaid bronze embellished with hardstone.  Pre-sale estimate for the 10" long beast is $50,000-$60,000. 

The catalog cover lot is a rare Eastern Han blue-glass model of a courtyard surrounded by four buildings with a front entrance. The ornament is 12" X 5". Possibly unearthed near Huangnigan Hepu County, Guangx, as were similar glass items in the Guangxi Museum, Lot 152, valued at $400,000-$500,000.

To view the complete catalog, please visit www.gianguanauctions. com. The New York preview runs December 2nd through Friday, December 9th. The sale starts at 10:00 a.m. on Saturday, December 10th. It will be conducted live at Gianguan Auctions, 39 W. 56th Street and on liveaucitoneers.com and invaluable.com. For details, please contact Gallery Director, Gianguan Auctions at info@gianguanauctons.com or call 212 867-7288 212 867-9388 .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Press Contact:
Gallery Director
Gianguan Auctions
P: 212-867-7288
info@gianguanauctions.com
 

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