At iGavel Auctions, Korean Art Leads in Spring Asian Sales

  • 19th century Korean eight-panel screen, depicting a Korean-court scene

    19th century Korean eight-panel screen, depicting a Korean-court scene

    iGavel Auctions

  • Chinese Tibetan gilt seated Bodhisattva statue

    Chinese Tibetan gilt seated Bodhisattva statue

    iGavel Auctions

  • Chinese Cizhou Pottery Pillow, Song/Yuan Dynasty

    Chinese Cizhou Pottery Pillow, Song/Yuan Dynasty

    iGavel Auctions

This Spring season iGavel Auctions mounted three simulataneous Asian art auctions with over $2,000,000 in combined sales. Buyers were attracted to many fine examples of Chinese bronzes, jades, furniture, porcelain; Japanese woodblock prints, and other Asian items. However, the strong results of Chinese and Japanese items were superseded by Korean art sold by Lark Mason Associates.

The top lot, a 19th century Korean eight-panel screen, depicting a Korean-court scene, went into extended bidding for 32 minutes and finally closed at $225,000 with 40 bids, more than four times its high estimate. The nine Korean art lots combined sold for over $316,900. Of these nine lots, seven went into extended bidding.

“Once again, Korean art achieved stunning results on the iGavel auction site,” said founder Lark Mason, whose Lark Mason Associates auction platform is one of the leading purveyors of Korean art. “Bringing these great works of art to an international clientele is very gratifying.”

Other highlights included several items from Lark Mason Associates, Petrie Rogers Art, and Quinn’s Auction Gallery. A Chinese 20th century zitan table sold outside of its estimated range for $106,000; eleven Chinese bronze mirrors from the Han to Tang Dynasties sold well at a combined $76,500; and a Song/Yuan Dynasty Cizhou Pillow sold for 40 times its high estimate for over $40,000. A Sino-Tibetan gilt bronze Bodhisattva sold by Quinn’s Auction Gallery for 24 times its high estimate brought $48,750. Petrie Rogers had a Chinese, Qing Dynasty painted and embroidered silk panel sell for over ten times its high estimate at $23,125. A group of 112 lots of Japanese woodblock prints from the 18th century to 20th century had much competitive bidding with 92% selling for a total of over $104,000.

Among the other top lots sold were:

Chinese Carved Zitan Altar Table, Republic / 20th Century or Earlier

Sold for: $106,250

Lark Mason Associates

Chinese Tibetan gilt seated Bodhisattva statue

Sold for: $48,750

Quinn’s Auction Galleries

Chinese Cizhou Pottery Pillow, Song/Yuan Dynasty

Sold for: $40,000

Chinese Archaic Bronze Lobed Dragon Mirror, Tang Dynasty

Sold for: $28,750

Lark Mason Associates

Large Chinese Qing Dynasty Painted and Embroidered Silk Figural Panel

Sold for: $23,125

Petrie Rogers Art

About Lark Mason

With locations in New Braunfels, Texas and New York City, Lark Mason Associates, the eponymous, auction house specializing in Asian, ethnographic, and ancient works of art, was founded by Lark Mason after many years as an expert at Sotheby's New York.

Mason served as a General Appraiser from 1979 until 1985, and as a Senior Vice President and specialist in Chinese art with Sotheby's Chinese Works of Art Department from 1985-2003.  From 2000-2003 he concurrently was a Director of Online Auctions for Sothebys.com. He also served as a consulting curator at the Trammel and Margaret Crow Collection of Asian Art in Dallas, Texas from 2003-2009. He is a generalist in American and European works of art and paintings, as well as an expert in the field of Chinese art and has valued and advised many private collectors and institutions.

Lark Mason Associates regularly hosts auctions on the iGavel Auctions platform and has an established history of record sales of Chinese and other works of art and holds the record for the highest price achieved for any work of art in an online sale, for a painting sold in May 2014 that realized close to $4.2m. Mason, the owner and CEO of iGavel Auctions, is noted for his regular appearances on "The Antiques Road Show."

 

 

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