Friday is Last Day to Preview Gianguan Auctions' Asia Week Sale

  • "Lotus in the Wind," Zhang Daqian.  Dated 1946.  Gianguan Auctions Lot 139.

    "Lotus in the Wind," Zhang Daqian. Dated 1946. Gianguan Auctions Lot 139.

  • Famille rose bottle neck vase with wire outlines of 6 Buddhist lions on black background.  Qing Dynasty.  Gianguan Auctions Lot 128.

    Famille rose bottle neck vase with wire outlines of 6 Buddhist lions on black background. Qing Dynasty. Gianguan Auctions Lot 128.

  • GIA certified jadeite bangle bracelet.  Gianguan Auctions Lot 7.

    GIA certified jadeite bangle bracelet. Gianguan Auctions Lot 7.

Friday, March 10, is the final day to preview the Chinese and Korean works of art in Gianguan Auctions' Asia Week sale. The action takes place on Saturday, March 11, at the midtown gallery, 39 W. 56th Street. Buyers can also bid on liveauctioneers.com and invaluable.com.

Preview hours are 10:00 a.m. til 7:00 p.m.The sale starts at 10 a.m. on Saturday. According to Kwong Lum, Founder and President of Gianguan Auctons, "This year's Asia Week sale presents the finest of the year's consignments as well as rare collectibles culled from a broad selection of collections. Values range from $1,000 to $3M."   

Highlights of the sale receiving generous attentioin include the marquee item, a remarkable example of Famille rose on a black glaze. In addition to the colorful floral enameling, the  bottle-neck vase is embedded with gilt wire outlines around six Buddhist lions. The blue reign mark and Qianlong six-character mark are on its base. It is Lot 128. Estimate is “by request”.   

Lot 97, a refreshing Wucai fish jar with cover, reminiscent of one in Paris’  Musee Guimet, reflects the porcelain preference of Ming emperors Jiajing, Longqing and Wanli. The depiction of golden carp in a lotus pond plays out on a translucent white ground with underglaze blue enlivened by enamels of golden yellow, green, red, brown. The globular jar is early Ming with the the Jiajing six-character mark. It is valued at $3M.  

Leading the paintings is “Gathering Beneath the Sycamore Tree,” by Qiu Ying (1495-1552). It is painted in the gongbi (realistic) style and evokes a slice of life among women of the Ming court.  Signed Qiu Ying, with one artist seal, seven emperors’ seals, six collectors’ seals and colophon by Gao Shiqi, Lot 72 is estimated at $1.3M.

Twentieth century artists taking their turn at the podium include Zhang Daqian, represented by no less than nine works. At the high end, Lot 141 “Tibetan Girl with Mastiff,” dated 1945, is a full length portrait of a woman in a red coat leading her dog. It is signed with two artist seals, and  expected to bring $150,000. Lot 139 is “Lotus in the Wind,” 1946, a more abstract work with bold dark splashes and strategically placed color is inscribed, signed, and has three artist seals. The bidding starts at $46,000.

Works by Li Keran range in value from $10,000 to $60,000. The Qi Baishi collection has estimates of $40,000–$60,000. 

Collectibles include a 16-lobe cinnabar box with cover similar to examples now on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, it iis carved with pigmented dragons that gambol amidst clouds. Of the Qing period, it is Lot 160, expected to go off at upwards of $8,000.

A small collection of Korean water droppers add a touch of whimsy to the proceedings. Of the Josean Dynasty, the scholars' objects include Lot 283, an abstract lion with suppressed spout, Lot 280, with blue Daoist trigrams and a yin/yang symbol, and Lot 281, of peach form and decorated with blue floral flourishes. Prices range from $500-$1,000. The sale also has a collection of Korean ceramic vases, also of the Josean period.

Wearable carved jades with GIA certificates include an elegant, cylindrical jadeite bangle of translucent green with vivid emerald streaks. It is Lot 7, valued at $20,000. A jadeite bamboo pendant with an auspicious silver squirrel descending from the bail, Lot 8, is set to fetch about $5,000.

For images and details on these and all properties in the auction, please visit www.gianguanauctions.com. Better yet, visit the gallery. Today is the final day to preview. Hours are 10 a.m. -7:00 p.m.

Founded in 2001, Gianguan Auctions is an independent participant in the week of celebrations and exhibitions collectively called Asia Week. Visitors will not find it on the Asia Week NY map. The address is 39 W. 56th Street, 3rd Floor. The auction house of record for many international buyers, Gianguan Auctions welcomes speakers of both Chinese and English with an informed, bi-lingual staff.

Press Contact:
Gallery Director
Gianguan Auctions
P: 212-867-7288.
info@gianguanauctions.com
 

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