Childe Hassam's The East Hampton Elms in May brings $288,000 at Shannon's

  • MILFORD, Connecticut
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  • May 06, 2013

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Oil painting by Childe Hassam, titled The East Hampton Elms in May ($288,000).

 (MILFORD, Conn.) – A large and important oil painting by the renowned American Impressionist Childe Hassam (1859-1935), titled The East Hampton Elms in May, sold for $288,000 at an auction held Apr. 25 by Shannon’s Fine Art Auctioneers in Milford, Conn. The painting was the top lot of 156 works offered.

Many other paintings brought high prices in an auction that grossed $2.1 million. “What this sale showed was that not only is there interest at the high end of the art market, but strong interest, too, in the middle market – artworks in the $5,000-$50,000 arena,” said auction house co-owner Gene Shannon. “That segment had taken a hit following the financial crisis, and it is a good sign to see it revived.”

Close to 100 people packed Shannon’s Milford gallery, while many others registered to bid online, via Artfact.com. A bank of 18 phones was kept busy throughout the evening. “If we had twice the merchandise, we could have sold it,” Shannon remarked. “The money’s out there and the demand is strong.”

Other notable prices were $132,000 for a pop art work by Nicholas Krushenick; and a small painting by the noted Philadelphia Impressionist Martha Walter, titled Tea Party, sailed past its high pre-sale estimate to hammer for $90,000.

Following a longstanding pattern at Shannon’s, the Hudson River School proved to be quite popular with bidders. An oil by Jasper Francis Cropsey, titled Greenwood Lake in the Autumn (1890) soared to $72,000; and a 10 inch by 16 inch oil on canvas landscape by David Johnson, titled Spring – A Study on the Bronx at Mt. Vernon, dated 1873, brought $50,400.

A small oil on board by William Trost Richards, titled White Face Mountain From Lake Placid, changed hands for $25,200.

Pop Art prints were led by two giants in the industry. A color offset lithograph by Andy Warhol titled Liz (On Red) (1964) and depicting Elizabeth Taylor, hammered for $43,200; and another color offset lithograph by Roy Lichtenstein, titled Crying Girl (1963), realized $50,400.

A haunting untitled egg tempera of a woman by George Tooker, went for $66,000. A Guy Wiggins of the New York Public Library in snow brought $45,600. Dale Nichols as always sold well at Shannon’s (which holds the world record for the artist at auction at $78,000). Tuis auction featured The Sentinel, a dominant tree on a snowbound Nebraska farm, which went for $45,600, and Silent Morning, a later snow scene, that realized $21,600.

Other notables were Henri Lebasque at $55,200; Edouard Cortes' Paris Street scene for $36,000; an Alexander Calder gouache brought $31,200; Henri Rousseau, Horses by an Arab Gate, with eight phones from Europe, realized $$31,200; two trompe l’oeil paintings of money by Otis Kaye hammered down for $28,800 and $12,000; and a violin with music sheet by Nicholas Alden Brooks brought $28,800 in heated competition.

Shannon Fine Art Auctioneers’ next big auction is scheduled for Thursday, Oct.24. They are always accepting quality consignments for future auctions. To consign a single piece of artwork, an estate or an entire collection, you may call them at (203) 877-1711; or, you can email them at info@shannons.com. To learn more about Shannon’s Fine Art Auctioneers and the Oct. 24 auction, please log on to www.shannons.com.

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Shannon's Fine Art Auctioneers
49 Research Drive
Milford, Connecticut
info@shannons.com
(203) 877-1711
http://www.shannons.com
About Shannon's Fine Art Auctioneers

Shannon’s Fine Art Auctioneer’s opened in 1997 as Connecticut’s premier fine art auction house. Founded by partners Gene and Mary Anne Shannon, the firm quickly established a reputation for integrity, knowledge of fine art and personalized service. With over 40 years of experience as a fine art dealer and auctioneer, Gene Shannon provides his clients specialist knowledge of American and European 19th and early 20th century paintings and the fine art market.


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