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Science and Art Come Together in Inaugural Exhibition at Manhattan's The Climate Museum

New York , New York -- 06 February 2018
Whale Bay, Antarctica No.  4, 84x144, 2016, (reproduction) by Zaria Forman.  Window installation to Jan.  15, 2018.
Whale Bay, Antarctica No. 4, 84x144, 2016, (reproduction) by Zaria Forman. Window installation to Jan. 15, 2018.
88 Cores screen tests: -1855 meters and -2952 meters (88 Cores by Peggy Weil; 4 hours 29 minutes; 2017).  On view January 19, 2018 – February 11, 2018.
88 Cores screen tests: -1855 meters and -2952 meters (88 Cores by Peggy Weil; 4 hours 29 minutes; 2017). On view January 19, 2018 – February 11, 2018.
(ArtfixDaily.com

Work spotlighting ice cores on view in the Parsons School of Design’s Sheila C. Johnson Design Gallery, 66 Fifth Avenue

In New York, The Climate Museum has opened the second leg of In Human Time, the organization’s inaugural exhibition in partnership with Parsons School of Design at The New School.

On view at Parsons’ Sheila C. Johnson Design Center (SJDC), the two-part exhibition In Human Time features work by artists Zaria Forman and Peggy Weil, who examine intersections of polar ice, humanity, and time. The second part — Peggy Weil’s new work, a descent through the Greenland Ice Sheet — is on view 24 hours a day, inside the gallery during regular hours and from the street, and through the gallery’s windows at night, January 19, 2018 – February 11, 2018.

88 Cores, shown for the first time as part of this exhibition, is a film that captures a two-mile descent through the Greenland Ice Sheet in one continuous pan going back more than 110,000 years in time. This work is the fourth in a series of under-landscapes by Weil — projects treating solid ground as a canvas of critical processes and phenomena.

The installation is accompanied in the hallway outside by artifacts and media offering context on ice core science and the Arctic.

“I’m honored to be participating in The Climate Museum’s inaugural exhibition,” Weil says.  “88 Cores explores deep space and deep time, concepts critical to understanding the scale of climate change. The immensity and grandeur of the ice is matched only by its fragility and role as a bellwether of future change.”

Weil’s work has been exhibited internationally. Weil teaches at UCLA’s Design Media Arts Program and USC’s School of Cinematic Arts. She acts as an Advisor to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s Art + Technology Lab.

“We are delighted to present Peggy’s work in partnership with the extraordinary SJDC team at Parsons as the second part of our first exhibition, In Human Time,” says Miranda Massie, director of the Climate Museum. “Peggy’s brilliant new work exemplifies the power of art to build the climate conversation by provoking awe and enlarging our sense of time, key pathways toward a new climate citizenship.“

“88 Cores literally allows ice sheets to tell their story about climate change,” says Christiane Paul, the SJDC’s director and chief curator. “We are privileged to collaborate with the Climate Museum on creating a platform for discussing the complexities of one of the most pressing issues of our time.”